The world’s most powerful solar telescope captures a stunning image of the sun

The world's most powerful solar telescope captures a stunning image of the sun
The world's most powerful solar telescope captures a stunning image of the sun

With the Sun entering its 11-year solar cycle, there will be an increase in solar activity and solar output in the coming months, as solar flares have been frequent these past few months.

There have been 32 Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed from the Sun in the past two weeks. It is challenging to take pictures of the Sun since a powerful telescope is required to do so. This amazing feat has been achieved by the Inouye Solar Telescope.

This stunning image of the Sun’s chromosphere was captured by the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope of the U.S. National Science Foundation. A press release from the National Science Foundation (NSF) describes the image as showing hair-like plasma, called granules, covering a region of nearly 82,500 kilometers. Using the hydrogen-beta line from the Balmer series, the NSO took this stunning image of the Sun at 486.13 nanometers.

How does the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope work?

A 25-year research effort led to the creation of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope, according to the National Science Foundation. Hawaii’s Maui volcano Haleakala is home to this observatory. With the release of this stunning image of the Sun, the telescope has marked one year in service.

NSF director Sethuraman Panchanathan stated in the press release that the Inouye Solar Telescope is the world’s most powerful solar telescope that will forever change our understanding of the sun. As a result of its insights, we will be able to predict and prepare for events such as solar storms in a better way for our nation and the planet.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe and ESA’s Solar Orbiter as well as NASA’s Inouye Solar Telescope have collected important data for various space agencies around the world.